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PACKAGES

MASTERWORKS
9 or 6 Package
Works by Beethoven, Mussorgsky, Liszt, Rossini, Bartok, Mozart, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Bernstein, Bruch, Shostakovich, Mahler 

BALLET
5 Package
Season Opening Spectacular, Dracula: Bloodlines, The Nutcracker, Perspectives, Sleeping Beauty 

OPERA
5 Package
Season Opening Spectacular, Rigoletto, The Pirates of Penzance, Star Recital, Salome
 

SUPERPOPS
6 Package
Hits of Lerner & Loewe, Hometown Holiday, Cirque Musica: Crescendo, Celtic Spirit with Eileen Ivers, Best of John Williams II, Hello Louis! with Byron Stripling
 

ROCKIN’ ORCHESTRA
6 Package
Jefferson Starship, The Last Waltz, The Magic of Motown, A Salute to The Eagles, Top Twenty Rock Hits, Sgt. Pepper's Complete
 

SUNDAE CLASSICS
(Formerly Classical Connections)
5 Package
Bruch and Mussorgsky, Bernstein and Brahms, Tchaikovsky: Sleeping Beauty, Sgt. Pepper's Classical Connections Edition, Mahler Symphony No. 1 
 

RECITAL SERIES
(formerly Chamber)
4 Package
String Quartet Gems, Star Recital, Concertmaster's Choice, Wildcard

 
FAMILY

4 Package
PhilharMonster, Nutcracker Matinee, The Pirates of Penzance, Bach to the Future

 
SIGNATURE EVENTS
SPECIAL EVENTS

Order now with your Ticket Package
Season Opening Spectacular, Dracula: Bloodlines, Handel's Messiah, John Denver Rocky Mountain Christmas, New Year's Eve: Fiesta, Sgt. Pepper's: The Classical Connections Edition, DCDC 50th Anniversary, Video Games Live

FLEXPASS
4, 6, 8, 10 or 12 Package
Order coupons and exchange later for best-available seats

 
A-TIER
4, 6, 8, 10 or 12 Package
Similar to FlexPass but seats may be selected early
 

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Pictures at an Exhibition: Just One of the Otherworldly, Romantic, Exotic Works Set to Open the Masterworks Season

Pictures at an Exhibition
Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra | Masterworks Series

SCHUSTER CENTER
8:00 pm Friday, September 28, 2018 
8:00 pm Saturday, September 29, 2018
Take Note pre-concert talk at 7:00

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DEBUSSY–MOLINARI
L'isle joyeuse
BRUCH
Violin Concerto No. 1
MUSSORGSKY
RAVEL Pictures at an Exhibition


YEVGENY KUTIK violin
NEAL GITTLEMAN conductor

Rich with romance and orchestral color, this program illustrates the power of music to create elaborate visions in the mind and deep feelings in the heart. Two of the works on this program started as solo piano pieces.

The first example is Debussy's piano piece L’isle joyeuse (The Joyful Island), which was initially inspired by Antoine Watteau's painting L’Embarquement de Cythère, depicting a group of revelers as they depart for the mythical island of Cythera, birthplace of Aphrodite, goddess of love. The music also came to symbolize the Channel Island of Jersey, off the coast of Normandy, where Debussy escaped with Emma Bardac, who became his second wife. 

Soloist Yevgeny Kutik joins the Orchestra next for a veritable musical declaration of the romantic soul: Max Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor. The pinnacle of his composing career, Bruch's concerto is a marvel of craft employing great clarity of design, romantic sonority, and graceful melody. The result is a piece of music that cannot fail to move the heart.

The death of Russian architect and painter Viktor Hartmann in 1874 triggered a chain of events that led to the creation of one of the most beloved compositions in the whole of classical literature, Pictures at an Exhibition.

Composer Modest Mussorgsky and Hartmann were dear friends, and the composer's grief led him and his associate, Vladimir Stasoff, to mount a memorial exhibition of Hartmann's work. This energized Mussorgsky, who fell to work feverishly creating a piano suite depicting the paintings. The flow of the musical narrative follows a walk through a gallery as we "see" an exhibition of ten paintings. The paintings are interspersed here and there with a "promenade" theme that moves us along.

Our story then turns to Boston in 1922 and its accomplished Orchestra. Its maestro, Serge Koussevitzky, commissioned the famous French composer Maurice Ravel to orchestrate Mussorgsky's piano suite. It was a perfect match; Mussorgsky provided the impetus, and Ravel's agile mind and keen orchestral knowledge brought an explosion of color, contrast and dramatic dynamics to the picture.


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"An old-fashioned rhapsodic style, which was magnified by his rich, sweet tone." - The New York Times

Bruch and Mussorgsky
Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra | Sundae Classics

SCHUSTER CENTER
3:00 pm Sunday, September 30, 2018
Graeter's Ice Cream Social and Q&A follows concert

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BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor
MUSSORGSKY–RAVEL Pictures at an Exhibition

YEVGENY KUTIK violin
NEAL GITTLEMAN conductor

The afternoon opens with a veritable musical declaration of the romantic soul: Max Bruch's Violin Concerto No. 1. The pinnacle of his composing career, Bruch's concerto is a marvel of craft employing great clarity of design, romantic sonority, and graceful melody. The result is a piece of music that cannot fail to move the heart.

Soloist Yevgeny Kutik joins the Dayton Philharmonic for this beautiful work. Hailed for his dazzling command of the violin and its repertoire, as well as a communicative immediacy that harkens back to the legendary Romantic masters, Russian-American violinist Yevgeny Kutik has become a highly sought-after artist on the concert stage worldwide. The New York Times, among others, has sung Kutik's praises.

Maestro Gittleman and the DPO then turn to Mussorgsky's heartfelt Pictures at an Exhibition. The death of Russian architect and painter Viktor Hartmann in 1874 triggered a chain of events that led to the creation of this masterpiece, one of the most beloved compositions in the whole of classical literature.

Composer Modest Mussorgsky and Hartmann were dear friends, and the composer's grief led him and another associate, Vladimir Stasoff, to mount a memorial exhibition of Hartmann's work. This energized Mussorgsky, who fell to work feverishly creating a piano suite depicting the paintings and honoring his departed friend. The flow of the musical narrative follows a walk through a gallery as we "see" an exhibition of ten paintings. The paintings are interspersed here and there with a "promenade" theme that moves us along.

Our story then turns to Boston in 1922 and its accomplished Orchestra. Its maestro, Serge Koussevitzky, commissioned the famous French composer Maurice Ravel to orchestrate Mussorgsky's piano suite (we will hear more about Koussevitzky later for the January Masterworks). It was a perfect match; Mussorgsky provided the impetus, and Ravel's agile mind and keen orchestral knowledge brought an explosion of color, contrast and dramatic dynamics to the picture.  

The afternoon concludes with a casual Q&A in the Wintergarden of the Schuster Center, along with an Ice Cream Social with a free scoop of Graeter's.


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Sparks Fly When Acclaimed Pianist Misha Dichter Takes Center Stage for Franz Liszt's Piano Concerto No. 1

Star Power: Misha Plays Liszt
Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra | Masterworks Series

SCHUSTER CENTER
8:00 pm Friday, October 12, 2018 
8:00 pm Saturday, October 13, 2018
Take Note pre-concert talk at 7:00

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BERNSTEIN Dance Episodes from On the Town 
LISZT Piano Concerto No. 1 
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2

MISHA DICHTER piano
NEAL GITTLEMAN conductor     

With the approach of winter, the air outside starts to take on a chill. But inside the Mead Theatre, the climate will fairly burst with warmth as we welcome music from three of the most creative musical minds of all time.

Maestro Gittleman opens the program by taking us to the streets of an idealized New York City in wartime 1944. The musical On The Town has its roots in the ballet Fancy Free, choreographed by Jerome Robbins to Leonard Bernstein's score. This exuberent dance music (extracted from the original musical) captures the spirit, romance and joy of "New York, New York, what a wonderful town..."

Then we move to a work of pianistic lightning, performed by a seasoned master of his craft.

The out-and-out flamboyance of Franz Liszt's first Piano Concerto can obscure its innovative structure. When portrayed well, it seems as though the whole piece is improvised on the spot. Such is not the case. It is carefully calculated to be a dazzling exhibition of concerto dialogue as the piano confronts, battles, capitulates, and exhorts, all the while confronting the orchestra that, nonetheless, stands up to the onslaught as a willing partner. This is no delicate, polite parlor conversation; it truly emanates from the Romantic world.

Liszt was the rock star of his era, and we have a rock star of our own for this work. Misha Dichter's family fled Europe during World War II and arrived in California when he was two. Just three years later, he started piano study. Over time, Misha has virtually defined the role of piano virtuoso, playing works of wide scope from almost all the major composers and with almost every major orchestra. He has recorded with principal labels such as RCA and Philips. His recordings of the complete Franz Liszt Hungarian Rhapsodies and the Liszt Piano Concertos helped set the standard for other performers worldwide.

Johannes Brahms wrote his second symphony over the course of one summer in 1877. It is full and rich, lyrical and sunny, featuring a profusion of memorable melodies. Overall, this is an evening of music that expresses the joy of place and time, the joy of expression and the joy of just being alive.


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Bernstein, Brahms and Black Raspberry. We're Serving Up a Great Program Topped by a Scoop of Graeter's!

Bernstein and Brahms
Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra | Sundae Classics

SCHUSTER CENTER
3:00 pm Sunday, October 14, 2018
Graeter's Ice Cream Social and Q&A follows concert

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BERNSTEIN
Dance Episodes from On the Town
BRAHMS Symphony No. 2 

NEAL GITTLEMAN conductor, presenter
DAYTON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Maestro Gittleman opens the program by taking us to the streets of an idealized New York City in wartime 1944.

The musical On The Town has its roots in the ballet Fancy Free, choreographed by Jerome Robbins to Leonard Bernstein's score. Then Lenny, America's newly minted heartthrob composer/conductor, chanced upon his Broadway friends Betty Comden and Adolphe Greene in Hollywood. Why not expand the music from Fancy Free into a big musical and take Broadway by storm?

They did, and 462 performances later it sparked a legacy of great singable, danceable tunes, not to mention a hit film. The dance music performed on this program 
(extracted from the original musical) captures the spirit, romance and joy of "New York, New York, what a wonderful town..."

The program then turns to Brahms' warm and melodic Symphony No. 2 in D major.

After finally completing his first symphony, with performances that generated enthusiastic critical acclaim, Johannes Brahms quickly followed suit with his second work in the genre. Written over the course of one summer in 1877 (his first took 14 years), his Symphony No. 2 is full and rich, lyrical and sunny, featuring a profusion of memorable melodies.

Before the debut performance, the subversive Brahms taunted his friends, saying that the orchestra should play it with black crepe on their sleeves and that the score should be printed with a black border. Hardly! Its obvious exuberance expresses the joy of just being alive.

The afternoon concludes with a casual Q&A in the Wintergarden of the Schuster Center, along with an Ice Cream Social with a free scoop of Graeter's. What a fantastic way to spend an autumn Sunday afternoon.


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The Biggest Songs from the Biggest Shows from a Pair of Broadway's Most Legendary Masters

My Fair Broadway: The Hits of Lerner of Loewe 
Dayton Philharmonic | SuperPops Series

SCHUSTER CENTER
8:00 pm Friday, October 19, 2018
8:00 pm Saturday, October 20, 2018


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NEAL GITTLEMAN conductor
NAT CHANDLER, ALICIA HALL MORAN, ERIC VAN HOVEN vocalists

Lerner and Loewe, whose creative chemistry was comparable to that of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Dietz and Schwartz, and George and Ira Gershwin, were a less likely pairing than most other Broadway theatrical teams. Seventeen years older than his New York–born collaborator, Mr. Loewe came from the world of European operetta and in 1924 moved to the United States, where he struggled for years to gain a foothold in the musical theater.

Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe met in 1942 at the Lambs Club in New York City where, according to Loewe, he mistakenly took a wrong turn to the men's room and walked past Lerner's table. Lerner describes this initial meeting in his autobiography The Street Where I Live: "'You're Lerner, aren't you?' he asked. I could not deny it. 'You write lyrics, don't you?' he continued. 'I try,' I replied. 'Well,' he said, 'would you like to write with me?' I immediately said, 'Yes.' And we went to work."

Their collaboration pushed the art of the musical to new heights 14 years later with My Fair Lady, a Broadway show that is widely regarded as the 1950s Broadway musical at the pinnacle of perfection.

You'll hear songs from My Fair Lady and many more as the first SuperPops of the Vistas Season brings a generous serving of nostalgia and romance to the stage.

It's a sparkling evening set with musical gems. Lerner and Loewe's fruitful collaboration began with shows such as  Life of the Party, What’s Up?, and The Day Before Spring. And then in 1947, they had their first huge hit: Brigadoon. That fantastical show was only the first of their roaring successes: Paint Your Wagon, Camelot, and Gigi (which was first a film and then adapted for the stage). Few people can say that they haven’t heard a Lerner and Loewe composition. Who hasn’t whistled “Thank Heaven for Little Girls” or “Almost Like Being in Love”? The Philharmonic and our star singers will fill the Schuster with these and other favorites, such as “I Could Have Danced All Night” and “The Rain in Spain” from My Fair Lady; “Camelot” and “If Ever I Would Leave You” from Camelot; “They Call the Wind Maria” from Paint Your Wagon; “Say a Prayer for Me Tonight” from Gigi; and “There But for You Go I” from Brigadoon.

Don't miss this shining revue of Broadway's best when the hits of Lerner and Loewe come to the Schuster stage.


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Music Inspired by Spies, Aliens, Witches and Other Things That Go Bump in the Night. Kids of All Ages Welcome!

PhilharMonster Halloween Concert
Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra | Family Series

SCHUSTER CENTER
3:00 pm October 21, 2018
2:00 pm ~ Pre-concert fun in the Wintergarden

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SCHIFRIN–CUSTER
Mission: Impossible 
WENDEL "Trick or Treat" 
WILLIAMS Cantina Band Music from Star Wars 
COPLAND – arr. GITTLEMAN "Simple Gifts"
COPLAND "Variations on a Shaker Melody" 
MUSSORGSKY-RAVEL "Baba Yaga" and "The Great Gate at Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition 
STOOKEY The Composer Is Dead
HARRISON – arr. GITTLEMAN Spongebob Squarepants Theme

NEAL GITTLEMAN condu­ctor
PAUL HELFRICH narrator
DAYTON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

What does every child love about their bag of Halloween candy? Variety, of course!

We all loved the magical assortment we'd bring in after a good night's haul!

And so it is with this program. Your family will discover one treat after another.

From one of the most suspenseful TV themes ever written to an orchestral outing that illustrates a Beggar's Night romp; from a jaunty theme played at a seedy galactic bar to evocations of autumn from America's dean of composers; from scary music depicting a witch's hut on legs to a mystery revealing the murder of a composer: you'll join Neal and our artfully decorated musicians for an afternoon of fun and fantasy.

Our ever-creative Master of Ceremonies and Conductor, Maestro Neal Gittleman, will adopt a Halloween guise as is his tradition. Can you guess who he will be?

Be sure to wear your costumes and arrive at 2:00. Prior to the concert in the Wintergarden, we will provide activities for the whole family to enjoy.

Kids are invited to participate in the Halloween Costume Parade and more.

Who knew that being spooky could be so enchanting?

With prices at just $14 for kids, $20 for seniors, and $22 for regular adult admission, it's easy to afford seats for the whole family!




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Drac Is Back! The Breakthrough Ballet, Opera, and Philharmonic Multimedia Spectacular Returns

Dracula: Bloodlines
Dayton Ballet joined by Dayton Opera and Dayton Philharmonic

VICTORIA THEATRE
7:30 pm Thursday, October 25, 2018
8:00 pm Friday, October 26, 2018 
8:00 pm Saturday, October 27, 2018 
3:00 pm Sunday, October 28, 2018

Pre-performance Talk, 45 minutes prior to each performance
Post-performance Q&A with dancers from the stage

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KAREN RUSSO BURKE choreographer
AUSTIN JAQUITH composer 
OLIVIA YOKERS soprano
COURTNEY ELVIRA mezzo-soprano
TYLER ALESSI baritone

Back by overwhelming demand, Dayton Ballet returns to the Victoria Theatre stage to present a Dayton Performing Arts Alliance Signature Event: Dracula: Bloodlines.

Since the 1897 literary debut of Dracula, Bram Stoker’s story has been interpreted in various forms, but rarely has the backstory of this dark villain been explored.

Dayton Ballet’s Dracula: Bloodlines delves into the tale before the world’s most famous vampire emerged.

The horrifying myth of a historical figure named Vlad Tepes, known by many as Vlad the Impaler, a prince in the 15th century in an area near Transylvania, is the perfect place to begin. Act One of Dracula: Bloodlines will focus on this character and the events that led to his transformation into the best-known vampire in literary history. Act Two will see the emergence of familiar characters of the classic tale of Dracula, including Lucy, Jonathan Harker, Mina, Dr. Van Helsing, and Dracula himself.

Dayton Ballet Artistic Director Karen Russo Burke has created a riveting story that her masterful choreography brings to life on stage with the full force of the Dayton Ballet professional company of talented, athletic dancers. Guest vocalists from Dayton Opera will share the stage with Dayton Ballet to spotlight the production with a whole additional layer of meaning, and members of the Dayton Philharmonic Orchestra will provide live accompaniment.

The intrigue, shadowing, and mystery of this classic tale is the perfect setting for a story ballet in the haunting month of October. The full artistic forces of the DPAA will present an unforgettable evening of performing arts filled with drama befitting the mysterious Halloween season. Do you believe in vampires?

Dracula: Bloodlines may just convince you that bloodthirsty creatures of the night actually do exist. 

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2017–2018 Retrospective, Part I  

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